Global Digital Download

The Global Digital Download is a weekly publication that aggregates resources on Internet freedom, highlighting trends in digital and social media that intersect with freedom of expression, policy, privacy, censorship and new technologies. The GDD includes information about relevant events, news, and research. To find past articles and research, search the archive database.

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  • (The Wall Street Journal, Wednesday, October 15, 2014)
    What would a non-neutral Internet look like?
     
    So far, the debate over net neutrality has centered mostly on whether broadband providers could manipulate the speed of certain traffic on their networks, cutting deals with content partners to serve up their web pages faster than others. It’s easy to imagine an unwitting web surfer accessing some sites quickly and others slowly, and never really figuring out why.
  • (The Wall Street Journal, Wednesday, October 15, 2014)
    A new mobile messaging app that enables users to communicate in the absence of cellular or Internet connections is seeing a surge in downloads among Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters. The free FireChat app, which launched in March, was downloaded 100,000 times in Hong Kong between Sunday morning and Monday morning, said Micha Benoliel, co-founder and chief executive of San Francisco-based Open Garden, which developed the app.
  • (EFF Deeplinks, Wednesday, October 15, 2014)

    For years, local law enforcement agencies around the country have told parents that installing ComputerCOP software is the “first step” in protecting their children online. As official as it looks, ComputerCOP is actually just spyware, generally bought in bulk from a New York company that appears to do nothing but market this software to local government agencies.

  • (The Economist, Wednesday, October 15, 2014)

    STREETS in Hong Kong have been filled with protesters calling for democratic reform and tweeting their experiences furiously. But in mainland China, people are struggling to discuss the unrest online. Censors have been poring over Weibo, China’s closely controlled version of Twitter, to scrub out even oblique references to it.

  • (financial , Sunday, October 5, 2014)
    The battle among the world’s largest tech and telecoms groups to connect Africans has intensified in the past year, with drones and blimps brought in to provide the first sight of the internet for many in the region.
  • (The New York Times, Sunday, October 5, 2014)
    Micha Benoliel came to Hong Kong for a convenient layover between a technology conference in India and strategic partnership meetings in China. He stayed for the political unrest. Mr. Benoliel, a 42-year-old French-born entrepreneur, is the chief executive of Open Garden, a Silicon Valley start-up whose innovative, barely six-month-old app, FireChat, has become the rage in Hong Kong during the pro-democracy protests around the city.
  • (The Economist, Saturday, October 4, 2014)

    Streets in Hong Kong have been filled with protesters calling for democratic reform and tweeting their experiences furiously. But in mainland China, people are struggling to discuss the unrest online. Censors have been poring over Weibo, China’s closely controlled version of Twitter, to scrub out even oblique references to it.

  • (Global Voices, Saturday, October 4, 2014)

    Reggae artiste Chronixx drew the ire of Lisa Hanna, Jamaica's minister of youth and culture, over his comments about the government's lack of support for the arts. Their online exchange has attracted great attention, not just because Jamaicans are passionate about their culture, but also because many were surprised that a government minister would respond to criticism using social media.  

  • (Global Post, Saturday, October 4, 2014)

    At an informal meeting of EU telecommunications ministers in Italy's business capital Milan on Thursday and Friday, member states supported the evolution of Internet governance within an open and transparent multi-stakeholder model, Italy's undersecretary in charge of telecommunications and frequencies Antonello Giacomelli told a press conference at the end of the meeting.

  • (Global Voices, Saturday, October 4, 2014)

    Reggae artiste Chronixx drew the ire of Lisa Hanna, Jamaica's minister of youth and culture, over his comments about the government's lack of support for the arts. Their online exchange has attracted great attention, not just because Jamaicans are passionate about their culture, but also because many were surprised that a government minister would respond to criticism using social media.  d cultural festivities are now at the fingertips of millions in India.